Why We Love Black Dogs

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Here are our favorite things to love about black dogs:

1 Always ready to go

While you should always keep your dog clean and well-groomed, with a black dog that last-minute roll in the mud right before dinner guests arrive might be a little less noticeable! Compared to dogs with light fur, dirt shows up much less on black dogs — which can be convenient.

Photography ©damedeeso | Getty Images

2 Improve your photography

Want a new hobby? Black dogs might be very photogenic, but they can also be harder to photograph, especially inside or in low-lighting situations. Like any other dog guardian, you are going to want to take lots of pictures of your dog, so you’ll end up becoming an amateur photographer to get that perfect shot.

3 Look good in everything

Who doesn’t love to spoil their dog? Fancy dog collars, bandannas and even costumes all look fantastic on black dogs. You can go with any color accessory and it will stand out beautifully against your dog’s coat. Don’t forget bejeweled leashes and designer dog beds. Your black dog will coordinate with any doggie décor or accessory!

Photography ©GlobalP | Getty Images

4 Match your tux/gown

Do you like to dress up? Having a black dog means your pup will always coordinate with your favorite little black dress. Not into dressing up but wear a lot of black? Having a black dog means that your dog’s fur is way less likely to show up on you. Basically, black dogs make anyone look more pulled together.

5 Hide-and-Seek

Your black dog will be the perfect hide-and-seek partner because of how easily he can blend into dark corners of your house. As a fun trick, teach your black dog to hide in closets or corners, but don’t forget to teach your dog to
come, or you might be searching for a while!

6 They might be magical

In Europe and especially England, there are many examples in folklore about apparitions of black dogs. Although sometimes this mythology portrays these big, black dogs as haunting “hellhounds,” the ancient Egyptians worshiped the god Anubis who was associated with the afterlife. Anubis is depicted as a black dog-like figure. God or hound of hell — either way you have a brilliant built-in Halloween costume!

7 Introvert bestie

Don’t like talking to people? Get a black dog! People have a lot of preconceived misconceptions that black dogs are mean or unapproachable, so having a black dog might mean people leave you alone, which means more uninterrupted time hanging out with your dog! (Although you should always be a black dog ambassador and help dispel people of that myth!)

8 Hidden speed bump

Black dogs are likely to make you go bump in the night! It seems like all dogs like to sleep right where your feet need to be, and black dogs are almost invisible, especially in the middle of the night when you’re heading to the kitchen for a drink of water or a snack. The good thing is if there were ever a burglar, your black dog would also trip them — and then probably lick them to death.

Sassafras Lowrey is an award-winning author. Her novels have been honored by organizations ranging from the Lambda Literary Foundation to the American Library Association. Sassafras is a Certified Trick Dog Instructor, and assists with dog agility classes. Sassafras lives and writes in Brooklyn with her partner, a senior Chihuahua mix, a rescued Shepherd mix and a Newfoundland puppy, along with two bossy cats and a semi-feral kitten. Learn more at sassafraslowrey.com

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The post Why We Love Black Dogs by Sassafras Lowrey appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.